Physical activity protects the brain, therefore reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Physical activity protects the brain, therefore reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease

A study reveals that physical activity protects the brain. Being active could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by 50%.

Everyone can benefit from physical activity, according to a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. According to the work of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California (USA), active people have a greater volume of gray matter than sedentary people. Transposed to the elderly, this finding can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Regardless of the physical activity performed, the benefits are there. They are even significant since mathematical models based on data collected from 876 people over 65 years old show a 50% reduction in the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. If the risk decreases for active people who are not yet affected, physical activity is also beneficial for people with the disease.

Exercise burns calories, which results in less gray matter loss, thus protecting the brain areas responsible for memory and cognition.

“Our study is one of the largest to examine the relationship between physical activity and cognitive decline, and the results confirm that staying active protects the brain,” says James Becker, one of the study’s authors. For the scientists, the results of their study suggest that prescribing physical activity to help prevent memory deterioration.

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